Overall Recommendation:
4.0 stars
(1)
5 Stars:
0%
(0)
 
4 Stars:
100.0%
(1)
 
3 Stars:
0%
(0)
 
2 Stars:
0%
(0)
 
1 Stars:
0%
(0)
 
Premise:
5.0 stars
(1)
 
Story structure:
4.0 stars
(1)
 
Character:
5.0 stars
(1)
 
Dialogue:
3.0 stars
(1)
 
Emotion:
4.0 stars
(1)
 
 
1-1 of 1 review
Sort: Newest | Most helpful
0 out of 0 people found the following review helpful:

... makes for compelling reading, and without doubt, an engaging film...

Overall Recommendation:
4 stars
 
Premise:
5 stars
 
Story structure:
4 stars
 
Character:
5 stars
 
Dialogue:
3 stars
 
Emotion:
4 stars
 
February 14, 2013
In the future, a family are on the run from a corrupt government that has the power to extend life and the authority to control birth: “Product 125” is rife with unethical concepts and unexpected plot twists, which sure makes for compelling reading, and without doubt, an engaging film – especially as one can relate the themes with happenings in today’s society.

The pace of the screenplay works very well to keep us thoroughly entertained. We begin with the creation of the Product 125 serum and its makers – Dr. Hydal and Dr. Jenkins - who have a heated discussion on whether it is ready for the world. The scene ends as people are coming for them. We are taken to the present day, with a brilliant description of the future and its citizens, introduced to the idea of the government controlling population, and the Franklin family. They plan to escape the city when Nic is whisked off for his death. After an emotional farewell, Charly and Hope continue with their plan to escape. However Hope does not make it and is held captive by Dr. Jenkins.

It is then up to Charly and Garth to free Hope from Jenkins. As they retreat to the desert from the sewers, they come across none other than Hydal in a cave who saves them from a complication with the Death Squad, and decides to help them get back to “The Castle” and rescue Hope. Meanwhile, Hope is in danger as they discover she is pregnant (something punishable by death) and Michael is the only one to help protect her.

Hydal dies as he blows up the cave, giving Garth and Charly enough time to escape. At The Castle, Hope encounters Orion: a boy that they cloned and tested Product 125 with, who has been concealed in his cell his entire life. Charly and Garth infiltrate The Castle, where there are dire consequences for Charly, an unexpected plot twist involving Michael and a turn of events as Jenkins dies. The screenplay ends with the world at peace, its citizens no longer controlled by the government and Product 125. Hope and Garth have their child, named after Charly and become the symbol of the “new age” that has just begun.

Overall, the three tiered structure has been used to great effect: the beginning sets the scene, introducing the characters and providing them with motives; the middle allows for much character development and progression of plot; and the ending which is done gloriously with many revelations, a good dose of action and an extremely satisfying conclusion.

Dr. Jenkins and Dr. Hydal (of which I love the play with Dr. Jekyll and Mr Hyde) are at the centre of the plot, the characters creating interesting binary oppositions which take the Franklin family into different directions. Dr. Jenkins is a brilliant villain: smart, cunning and cold, his motivations being stereotypically for power and money. His death at the pinnacle of the screenplay is quite fulfilling.

Nic – although not in the screenplay for long – is a powerful character: the father figure of both Hope and Charly, and the core motivation for their escape. When he is “sacrificed”, the emotion and atmosphere created is very real, shown by Hope and Charly’s struggle. Charly is brilliant as the secondary protagonist, and very much the hero of the film. She is a feisty, loving spirit that makes you root for her, and feel compassion when she dies.

Hope, being the main protagonist and “princess” character of the screenplay is an example of innocence against Jenkins and his ideologies: a fine example of being human which allows the audience to connect with her. Just like her parents, she is clever and outgoing and doesn’t hesitate to fight back in any way that she can. Her boyfriend, Garth (she is carrying their child) develops very well, as the more scenes he has with Charly, the more we see just how committed to his family he is, and how mature he can really be, despite his Death Squad exterior.

Michael, for me, was one of the most interesting characters. At first he is portrayed as a counsellor helping Hope come to terms with her father’s imminent death, who goes behind Jenkins back; his motives aren’t quite clear. Then, when he helps to protect Hope and stop Jenkins, he reveals that he is in fact Hydal’s son, also born outside of a birth cycle.

I found the dialogue was used effectively to explain events as they happen. Some lines flowed better than others, and it felt as though there wasn’t much difference in dialogue between the characters as you would expect, such as Jenkins and Hydal being more intelligent and scientifically advanced than Charly or Garth, but they sounded too similar for my own liking.

There was an abundance of emotion filled scenes, such as Nic’s death, the moment of bonding between Garth and Charly in the sewers, and the grand finale where I really felt for the characters. I commend your writing, as you have a “knack” of exploring different relationships and the impact that characters have on each other.

Speaking of writing, your style made this screenplay such a pleasure to read. You have a talent of describing locations, characters and action sequences in detail while keeping pace. I particularly like the futuristic world you have created, with chairs pulling up from the floor; these are nice touches that make Product 125 irresistible.

In terms of improvements for this draft, it’s just nit-picking the fine lines. I definitely feel that the dialogue could do with a little adjusting, to allow character’s personalities to shine through. In some scenes, such as with Hydal in the cave, the talking goes on for a little too long – although I understand it’s integral for the audience to follow the plot, as a film it does disrupt the pace slightly. At the beginning of the screenplay, you explain people’s real ages. However, I feel it would be better to make this a physical thing (e.g Birth Year on an ID badge) in order for the concept of appearing younger than you are to translate to the silver screen effectively. For your own benefit, I would also suggest lowering the age rating from 17, as the content isn't overly explicit or violent. There were a few grammatical errors which I would be more than happy to pick out to you in a private message.

Altogether, “Product 125” is an excellent Sci-Fi with thought provoking concepts, believable characters and an entertaining plot with many unexpected twists and turns. Hollywood producers and major film companies really should be chasing after this right now!
 

Reviews for